Jewish American Heritage Month: Celebrating New Americans

The JCPA is marking the 10th annual Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM) by promoting the theme “Celebrating New Americans.”  Throughout the month of May, JCPA will be highlighting stories of people from all backgrounds and ages who came to the United States looking for a new world to build their futures.  All shared a hope
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Federal Judge Rules Immigrant Children Should Not be Housed in Family Detention

On July 24, Judge Dolly Gee of the Federal District Court of California ordered the Obama administration to release immigrant children from detention facilities. After an increase in the number of Central Americans entering the United States last summer, the Obama administration pursued a detention policy for mothers with children to deter other families from
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Customs and Border Protection Advisory Panel Releases Use-of-Force Report

On June 30th, the CBP Integrity Advisory Panel, a subcommittee of the Homeland Security Advisory Council, determined that that the Customs and Border Protection agency (CBP) needs to reevaluate its use-of-force policies and training in light of claims outlining the mistreatment of immigrants due to a lack of supervision from trained CBP officials. This conclusion
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June 20, 2015: World Refugee Day

Saturday, June 20th marks World Refugee Day, a day dedicated to drawing our attention to the hardships that refugees face and the work we must do to help those fleeing from persecution. A recurring theme in our Jewish narrative is centered on our history as immigrants and refugees. The struggles of refugees resonates with the
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Love and America in a DP Camp

By Ruth Drimmer Gilad. This post is part of the JCPA’s “Celebrating New Americans” project as part of Jewish American Heritage Month.  My father, Karl Drimmer, was born in Vienna, Austria in 1915. Shortly thereafter, he and his family relocated to Borislav, Poland, to join their very large and extended family. After World War II broke out
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Reconnecting with my heritage

This post is part of the JCPA’s “Celebrating New Americans” project as part of Jewish American Heritage Month. By Leah Cooper. My work strives to reconnect with my heritage and family. In the melting pot that is America, most people lose sight of these connections to their original culture. I found myself falling into this
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My Father’s Best Story, My Father’s Secret

By Harriet Gold Maizels. This post is part of the JCPA’s “Celebrating New Americans” project as part of Jewish American Heritage Month. I remember that my Grandfather Felix was a stern and frightening man.
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The eternal wandering family.

This post is part of the JCPA’s “Celebrating New Americans” project as part of Jewish American Heritage Month.  My maternal family was the eternal “Wandering Jews”. They left Romania with three children in tow, in the dead of night, when their Christian police chief friend, warned them of a coming pogrom. At the turn of
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Isn’t life wonderful?

My father, Herbert Levy, was born in Nuremberg Germany on March 5, 1919. Unusual for Jews, he was not given a middle name. His family was upper-middle class. His grandfather invented a pen that could write in various colors depending upon which button is pressed. He had one sister, Hilde, born seven years before him.
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My Russian Cousins

This post is part of the JCPA’s “Celebrating New Americans” as part of Jewish American Heritage Month. Our Russian relatives arrived in NYC in the early 1990’s. Our families had been apart for almost a century. They brought their American cousins a reminder of how to live life with optimism and gratitude. By Susan Jensen
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Martha Levenbach Rosenberg “A Woman of Valor – Eshet Chayil” embodying the virtues of courage and strength.

This post is part of the JCPA’s “Celebrating New Americans” as part of Jewish American Heritage Month. Born in Bornheim, Germany in 1914 to Leo and Anna Levenbach, my mother was the third of four children.  Her father, observing the rise of Nazism, encouraged her to leave Germany, as had her two older siblings, Walter
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